Saturn 100

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "site in construction"

Réalisation Jean - Paul Perrier

 

 

 

Réalisation Jean - Paul Perrier

 

 

La lune bien sûr ...

 

              The moon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mais qu'aviez vous fait avant Herr Von Braun ?

 

Réponse avec citation

  #9
Membre
Supernova
 
 
 
 
Par défaut

Une drôle de vie quand même, ça fiche le tournis et fait réfléchir sur les tourbillons de l'histoire et les compromissions ( inévitables?) quand on fricote avec les gouvernement au nom d'un grand projet.

Ça commence comme du bricolage habillé à la Tintin, juste derrière Herman Oberth en personne. La naissance d'un très très bon ingénieur.



Ici, bien plus tard, ça devient une affaire d'état. Derrière Himler, en noir, c'est Von Braun en uniforme d'officier SS.
 
 
 
Cette photo fut longuement étudiée au pentagone mais est ce bien Von Braun derriére Himmler ?
 
 
 

 

                                                                              Wernhert von braun

                                                      Le jeune ingénieur SS Wernhert Von Braun portant une maquette d'un V2

 

Operation paperclip

De 1945 à 1955 l'opération Paperclip (" Trombonne " ) accorda à prés de mille scientifiques allemands la citoyenneté amèricaine . Beaucoup avaient été membre du parti nazi et de la gestapo et avaient dirigé des expèrimentations sur des étres humains dans les camps de concentration et commis d'autres crimes de guerre . Ces scientifiques furent empoyés dans des complexes militaires américains , à la CIA , à la Nasa et ailleurs ... Une expérimentation des nazis qui continua aux Etats unis fut le contrôle de l'inteligence ... connue sous le nom " CIA 's Project MK-ULTRA  " .

  

Wernher von Braun: The Father of the Ballistic Missile

 
                                 
 
One of the mainstays of the Cold War was the employment on both sides of the Iron Curtain of massive numbers of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles more commonly called ICBMs for short. Upon notification at the push of a button, a weapon can be launched utilizing rocket technology to propel a potentially destructive warhead on a one way trip anywhere on the globe to deliver a destructive message upon the enemy. The threat of nuclear destruction from the heavens was the stuff of nightmares but yet an ever present danger in throughout the years of the Cold War. Each side was always trying to best the other. Rocketry has become a weapon of war on a scale never seen before capable of not only breaching the outer perimeters of our atmosphere but also in propelling weaponry at speeds inconceivable years before at such great distances that detection or interception is difficult. The development of the ICBM is derived of technology envisioned decades earlier as the brainchild of one man. His name was Wernher von Braun.
 
Born Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun in Wirsitz, in the province of Posen at the time part of the German Empire on 23 March 1912, Wernher was the second of three sons born to a Magnus Freiherr von Braun and Emmy von Quistorp. He was born into an aristocratic family thus inheriting the title of Freiherr or 'Baron' and he could trace his family heritage to medieval European royalty as a descendant of Phillip III of France, Valdemar I of Denmark, Robert III of Scotland, Edward III of England, Mieszko I of Poland and ultimately Charlemagne. In his early years von Braun developed a passion for astronomy. Following the signing of the armistice and the end of the First World War, Wirsitz was transferred from Germany to Poland and the von Braun family moved to Germany settling in Berlin. It was here that he had his initial encounters with rocketry when he at the age of 12 was inspired by the speed records set by Max Valier and Fritz von Opel in rocket propelled cars. After blowing up a weapon to which he had attached fireworks he was arrested only to be released shortly thereafter.
 
An avid amateur musician, he learned to play both Beethoven and Bach from memory. By 1925, he was enrolled in a boarding school at Ettersburg Castle near Weimar. With his passion for space travel and rocketry fuelling his young mind, he acquired an influential work on the subject the book Die Rakete zu den Planetenräumen or By Rocket into Interplanetary Space written by Hermann Oberth a leading rocket pioneer. After being transferred to Hermann-Lietz-Internat, another boarding school located on the island of Spiekeroog; von Braun applying himself to the studies of physics and mathematics determined to pursue his interest in rocket engineering.
 
By 1930, he was attending the Technische Hochschule Berlin or 'Berlin Institute of Technology' where he became a member of the Verein für Raumschiffahrt 'Spaceflight Society'. He obtained a degree in aeronautical engineering from the Institute in 1932. From his early exposure to rocket sciences he developed the conclusion that rocket science was not advanced enough to support space exploration and would require more aspects of science than were currently applied to the field. He enrolled in the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Berlin for post graduate studies in the fields of physics, chemistry and astronomy where he would receive a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Physics in 1934. He received encouragement for his studies from the high altitude balloon pioneer Auguste Piccard.
 
 
Coinciding with his developing interests in rocket science, the situation in Germany has been shaped in years of turmoil and political upheaval. After the end of the First World War and the abdication of the German monarchy, the Weimar Republic had been instated with a liberal democracy. President of the Weimar Republic Paul von Hindenburg, a former Prussian General Field Marshal during the First World War initiated dictatorial emergency powers and reinstated the position of Chancellor of Germany by 1930. Germany would see several Chancellors in Heinrich Brüning, Franz von Papen and Kurt von Schleicher before finally Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor with the ascent of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or National Socialist German Workers Party commonly abbreviated as NSDAP or Nazi Party in 1933. With his focus on his doctoral studies, von Braun seemed for the most part unaware of the changes sweeping across Germany at the time. As a German born to an aristocratic family, he was patriotic towards his country but rocketry was his main focus. On 12 November 1937 he applied for membership in the Nazi Party and was assigned the membership number 5,738,692.
 
His activities with the Verein für Raumschiffahrt caught the attention of the Reichswehr, Germany's armed forces in 1932. While attending one of the launches of von Braun's rockets, Army officers took notice of the young engineer and the promise that he garnered towards the development of German rocket science. Walter Dornberger, an Artillery officer in the German Army Ordnance Corps presented von Braun with the opportunity to further develop his rockets through researching military applications for rockets. Presented with the opportunity of having his rocket research paid for at the behest of the German Army, von Braun couldn't refuse and accepted Dornberger's offer. Under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles following the end of the First World War, Germany had been prohibited the development of military aviation applications, rocketry had not been barred from research and thus development in rocketry was rapidly advancing.
 
In 1934, Wernher von Braun completed a work on the subject of rocketry in which he titled 'Construction, Theoretical, and Experimental Solution to the Problem of the Liquid Propellant Rocket'. Its contents were determined to be so vital to the national security of Germany that the document was given a classified status and transferred to the control of the German Army. Germany showed great interest in the works of American scientist Robert H. Goddard's works and regularly contacted him in the years leading up to the Second World War with technical questions and concerns. It was Goddard's works that von Braun incorporated into the development of his Aggregat or A series of rockets. The word Aggregat is a German word meaning 'The use of multiple appliances or machines to fulfill a certain technological function'. With von Braun now working with the German Army, the Verein für Raumschiffahrt which had rejected proposals from the German Army had a hard time finding funding for its own continued research and was dissolved in 1933.
 
 
 
With the dissolution of the Verein für Raumschiffahrt group, civilian rocket launches were banned by the new Nazi government with only rocket tests conducted for military purposes being authorized. The home for the advancement of these rocket tests and the location von Braun would come to call home was a large facility built near the village of Peenemünde in northern Germany located on the Baltic Sea. The Artillery Captain who had initially brought Wernher von Braun into military rocket science, Walter Dornberger became commander of the Peenemünde facility with Wernher von Braun as technical director. It would be here at Peenemünde in association with the German Luftwaffe that von Braun would contribute to the development of the A-4 ballistic missile and a supersonic guided anti aircraft missile designated 'Wasserfall'. Large amounts of research were dedicated to the development of liquid fuel rocket engines to power not only missiles but also aircraft engines and jet assisted takeoff devices.
 
On 22 December 1942, Adolf Hitler issued an order to initiate the A-4 rocket into the  Vergeltungswaffe or 'Revenge Weapon' program with aims of targeting London. Following the presentation of a film documenting a demonstration of the A-4, Hitler was so enthused by its promise that he made von Braun a professor of science. Following a bombing raid on the Peenemünde facility which killed several of von Braun's scientists by RAF Bomber Command, the first A-4 now designated V-2 for propaganda purposes was fired at England on 7 September 1944. Von Braun's rocket development in Peenemünde was in later years criticized for the use of slave labor from the Mittelbau-Dora and Buchenwald concentration camps.Under the influence of SS Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler, Wernher von Braun had been commissioned as an Untersturmführer 'Second Lieutenant' in the Allgemeine SS. Having expressed regret that he was not progressing his research towards his achievement of space exploration but that his scientific exploits were squandered on weapons for waging war, one that was not going well, Von Braun was arrested by Gestapo under charges trumped up by Himmler stating that he was a communist sympathizer with plans to sabotage the German rocket program before fleeing to England. He was only released from prison through the exploits of Walter Dornberger  and Albert Speer, the Reichsminister for Munitions and War Production.
 
With the Soviet Army near Peenemünde in 1945, von Braun assembled his staff and decided that enough was enough they had to surrender and bring an end to their war atleast. But to whom would they surrender to? It was decided that surrendering to the advancing Soviet Army was out of the question. The Soviets were well known for their brutal treatment of prisoners of war especially those who were documented members of the Nazi Party. It was decided that they would flee the Peenemünde facility and surrender to American forces. Under orders from SS General Hans Kammler, the team was to be relocated from Peenemünde to central Germany to progress their work. In the final days before the relocation, a contradicting report from Kammler ordered the scientists to join the Army and fight against the advancing Soviets. He and his team of nearly 500 associates fabricated documents and were transferred to Mittelwerk but not before ordering that many of his documents and blueprints be hidden away in an abandoned mine shaft in the Harz Mountains to avoid their destruction by the SS.
 
Following a car accident in which he suffered a compound fracture of the left arm and shoulder, he had his arm placed in a cast although a month later his arm would have to be rebroken and realigned due to negligent care of his wound. He was then transferred to the town of Oberammergau in the Bavarian Alps.
 
 
Von Braun's brother Magnus also a rocket engineer approached an American Private from the 44th Infantry Division and announced his intentions to surrender to the United States on 2 May 1945. On 19 June 1945, two days before the area was to be turned over to Soviet authorities US Major Robert B Staver, Chief of the Jet Propulsion Section of the Research and Intelligence Branch of the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps in London and Lieutenant Colonel R.L. Williams transferred von Braun and his team to Garmisch near Munich where they were then flown to Nordhausen and Witzenhausen in the American sector of Germany to avoid their fall into Soviet custody. After being debriefed by American and British intelligence officials he was recruited under Operation Paperclip where he was relocated to the United States.
 
Upon arrival in the United States, von Braun along with his team were granted funding to continue rocket research under the United States government and in exchange their association to the Nazi Party would be expunged from their records. Once their records had been cleared, the government granted the scientists security clearances for work at some of the nation's most sensitive facilities. The first stop for many of von Braun's associates were to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland to organize the documents brought to the United States from Peenemünde. Von Braun and his remaining Peenemünde team were sent first to Fort Bliss, Texas and White Sands Proving Grounds in New Mexico where they trained military personnel on the intricacies of rockets and guided missiles before helping refurbish, assemble and launch a number of captured V-2 rockets transported to the United States from Germany.
 
 
By 1950 and the outbreak of the war in Korea, Wernher von Braun and his team were transferred from Fort Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama where he would lead a U.S. Army rocket development team at Redstone Arsenal. The results of the research conducted by the team was the PGM-11 Redstone Rocket on 8 April 1952. The development of the Redstone rocket led to the first live nuclear ballistic missile tests conducted in the United States. A subsequent development in the development of the Redstone rocket was the first high precision inertial guidance system mounted on a rocket. Soon he would be appointed as Director of the Development Operations Division of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, where von Braun and his team would led the development of the Jupiter C series rocket which was essentially a modified Redstone rocket. The Jupiter C rocket would go on to perform three suborbital spaceflights throughout the 1950s before launching the West's first satellite known as Explorer I on 31 January 1958.
 
Von Braun remained determined to utilize his research in the subject of space exploration he began advocating space flight. With the Soviet Union launching Sputnik I on 4 October 1957, the way had been paved for von Braun to accomplish his dreams as the United States became determined to outdo the Soviets in the realm of space exploration. On 29 July 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration better known as NASA was established and in 1960, the Marshal Space Flight Center was opened at Redstone Arsenal. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency was transferred to NASA control under the provision that von Braun and his team be allowed to continue their research on a much larger rocket than the PGM-11 or Jupiter C series rockets which would be designated as the Saturn series rocket. Von Braun was designated as the Marshal Space Flight Center's first director presiding over the facility from July 1960 to February 1970.
 
 
 
 
 
From the successes of the Saturn program, the Apollo program for manned moon flights was developed and his dream for putting a man on the moon was realized when on 16 July 1969, one of his Saturn V rockets propelled the crew of Apollo 11 beyond the atmosphere of planet Earth to the lunar surface. Throughout the duration of the Saturn program, von Braun's rockets would put six teams of astronauts on the moon. He would be influential in the establishment of the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville. He also envisioned the idea of U.S. Space Camp for training children in the fields of science and technology. After relocating from Alabama to Washington DC to take a senior level position in NASA, von Braun retired from NASA on 26 May 1972 with the realization that his goals for space exploration and those of NASA's were not one in the same. In his latter years he would serve as Vice President for Engineering and Development for the Fairchild Industries company and performing services as a public speaker at colleges and universities across the country.
 
 
He helped to establish the National Space Institute in 1975 and became its first chairman as well as become a consultant to the CEO of Orbital Transport und Raketen AG, or 'Orbital Transport and Rockets, Inc' a West German company based in Stuttgart. His health gradually declined following the onset of kidney cancer which forced him to retired from Fairchild Industries on 31 December 1976. He was later hospitalized from complications due to cancer and was unable to attend a ceremony in which he  was presented the National Medal of Science. Wernher von Braun would die on 16 June 1977 of pancreatic cancer in Alexandria, Virginia at the age of 65. He was buried

 

 

Allemagne

Dorneberger et von Braun sont convoqués au Q.G. de Hitler, qui ordonne la priorité absolue pour le programme des fusées A4.

Toutes les photos de Von Braun avec Hitler ont été éliminée du domaine public au moment de l'opération Paper clip en 1945
 

 

Von Braun.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

 
  •  
  •  
.
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                        Ss von braun
 
 
                    Un groupe SS dont Von Braun en 1942
 
 
 
                                                                          Von Braun


Wernher von Braun, est le deuxième des trois fils du baron Magnus von Braun, né le 23 mars 1912 à Wirsitz, en Posnanie.


1) Une passion envahissante.

En 1927, dans un bistrot de Breslau, est crée la Verein fur Raumschiffart e.V. (VfR), l’Association pour les voyages dans l’espace est née.
Le petit groupe grandit et le 27 septembre 1930, s’installe à Reinickendorf, [sur un terrain de 150 hectares. En septembre 1931, von Braun assiste ainsi au 1er lancement, raté, d’un Mirak, un enginexpérimental, construit par Nebel et Riedel.

2) L’intérêt de l’armée.

Le colonel Karl Becker, directeur du bureau des engins balistiques spéciaux de la Reichswehr va confier au colonel Dornberger le développement d’une fusée militaire de portée supérieure au
canon. Au printemps 1932, le groupe de von Braun reçoit la visite des 2 hommes, venus assister au lancement d’un Mirak 2. Becker et Dornberger, impressionnés, invitent les jeunes gens à venir essayer leur fusée sur un champ de tir de l’armée, à Kummersdorf. En novembre 1932, Wernher von Braun devient, employé civil de l’armée allemande, sous la direction de Dornberger, pour développer un moteur de fusée à combustible liquide de forte puissance. Sans s’interroger plus avant sur les éventuelles conséquences de son engagement auprès des militaires, von Braun témoigne de son enthousiasme en ces termes :
Nous avions besoin d’argent pour nos expérimentations et dès lors que l’armée s’est intéressée à nos travaux, nous ne nous sommes plus trop soucié de l’avenir …

3) Von Braun et les nazis.

Le père de von Braun, ministre de l’Agriculture dans les derniers jours de la République de Weimar, décide de rester à l’écart du nouveau régime et essaye de convaincre son fils de faire de même, mais Wernher, ne choisit pas cette voie là !
En 1933, il commence par rejoindre plusieurs organisations affiliées aux Nazis dont la plus notoire, le club d’aviation national Deutscher Luftsport-Verbund. L’organisation devait tomber, l’année suivant, dans l’escarcelle du NS Fliegerkorps, le corps des aviateurs nazis sans que le jeune homme ne s’en offusque.
En 1934, il obtint un diplôme de doctorat en Physique de l’université Friedrich Wilhem.
Le 24 décembre 1934, sur l’île de Borkum, en mer du Nord, deux exemplaires de la fusée A2, baptisées Max et Moritz, sont lancés et montent jusqu’à 2 200 mètres d’altitude. L’armée décide alors d’investir massivement dans le prochain projet : le A3.
Von Braun est à la recherche d’un terrain d’essai plus grand. Il choisit alors, sur la côte poméranienne, dans l’île d’Usedom, le site de Peenemünde, propice au secret. Le 2 avril 1936, l’armée de terre et l’aviation allemandes y installent, conjointement, un centre consacré à la fabrication des fusées et aux essais. En 1935, la Luftwaffe accorde une dotation de 5 millions de marks au groupe von Braun, venant s’ajouter aux 6 millions déjà versés par l’armée. Il intègre d’ailleurs officiellement la Luftwaffe au début de mai 1936.
Au printemps 1940, le SS Standertenführer Mueller lui rend visite et fait pression sur l’ingénieur allemand pour que celui-ci prenne la carte du NSDAP. Chose faite, von Braun rentrant dans le parti nazi avec le grade d’Untersturmführer (Lieutenant).
« Ainsi, mon refus de rejoindre le parti aurait signifié que j’aurais eu à abandonner le travail de ma vie. Par conséquent, je décide d’y adhérer », devait expliquer von Braun, quelques années plus tard.

4) Peenemünde.

Von Braun devient directeur technique civil du centre, le 15 mai 1937. Les caractéristiques de la fusée A4, appelé à devenir le V2, sont figées avant la fin de l’année. Malgré les millions de marks injectés dans ce centre, les résultats sont décevants. La visite du Führer, le 23 mars 1939, atteste du scepticisme ambiant.
Au lendemain de la déclaration de guerre, dès le 5 septembre 1939, von Brauchtisch, commandant en chef de la Wehrmacht, place le programme des fusées sur la liste des priorités. Mais deux mois et demi plus tard, cette faveur est annulée par Hitler. Après sa victoire rapide contre la Pologne, le dictateur considère ne pas avoir besoin de fusées dans cette guerre. Hitler se base sur ce que certains historiens ont appelé une « perspective de tranchées », héritée de la 1e guerre mondiale où il se battit comme caporal d’infanterie. Cette conception des combats privilégie l’expérience du fusil et du mortier sur tout imaginaire d’innovation technologique majeur.
Pourtant les progrès de l’équipe de von Braun s’accélèrent et sont même sur le point d’aboutir ; dès la fin octobre 1939, avec le vol réussi de deux fusées A5, modèle réduit de la A4.
Le 25 février 1942, puis le 3 octobre 1942, une fusée A4 réussit son vol d’essai. C’est la première fusée moderne. Le lancement est suivi d’une allocution de l’ingénieur :
« avec notre fusée, nous avons pénétré dans l’espace. Nous avons fait la preuve que la fusée est utilisable pour les voyages spatiaux. Comme la terre, l’eau et l’air, l’espace aura un jour une importance politique. Ce 3 octobre 1942 est le premier jour d’une ère nouvelle : celle de la navigation spatiale. Mais tant que la guerre durera, notre tâche sera la mise au point des fusées comme armes de combats. Les autres développements encore imprévisibles, seront notre tâche une fois la paix revenue. »

5) Les armes de destruction et la main mise de la SS.

Devant la détérioration de la situation militaire, Hitler convoqua, le 7 juillet 1943, Dornberger et von Braun. Le père des fusées n’a pas vu le Führer depuis 4 ans. Il ordonne cette fois-ci la priorité absolue pour le programme des fusées A4. Dès lors, von Braun va travailler à la construction des « armes de représailles », les Vergeltungswaffen-1 et 2.
Le 18 août 1943, un raid anglais s’abat sur le site. Le 1er septembre 43, la production est transférée près de Nordhausen, dans une gigantesque usine souterraine creusée sous le mont Konhstein, dans le massif du Harz.
Heinrich Himmler a décidé de s’emparer du programme des fusées(*Nouvel exemple de la montée en puissance de la SS, durant la guerre.). La Waffen SS contrôle l’usine Mittelwerke et fournit la main d’œuvre puisée dans le camp de concentration de Dora. En 1943, la construction des V2 commence à utiliser des déportés de Dora-Mittlebau et Buchenwald, comme esclaves. Von Braun est un des dirigeants qui supervise les ingénieurs, les travailleurs civils et les détenus de Dora. La fabrication des V2 fit plus de morts que leur utilisation comme armes !
Von Braun convoqué par Himmler, le 21 février 1944, mais l’ingénieur refuse l’invitation d’entrer dans la SS. Mais le Reichführer SS va user de la ruse et de la contrainte pour amener l'ingénieur à la raison. Le 14 mars 1944, von Braun est arrêté est inculpé de sabotage. Libéré quelques jours plus tard, il comprend qu’il a été victime d’une entreprise d’intimidation. Le 8 août 1944,Himmler nomme Kammler comme son fondé de pouvoir pour l’ensemble du programme des fusées.
Un mois plus tard, la mise en service des V2 atteste du triomphe du jeune homme. Le V1, entrée en vigueur le 13 juin 1944, date à laquelle 9 missiles de ce type furent lancés sur l’Angleterre, avec un résultat décevant, sa vitesse relativement faible en faisant une cible aisée pour les adversaires. En revanche, le missile V2, 1er missile supersonique guidé, qui se déplace à 5 600 km/h, et employé à partir du 8 septembre 1944, sur Paris, se révèle beaucoup plus efficace.

Au total, pas moins de 3 255 V2 sont lancées, faisant 2 724 morts.
(*Exemple caractéristique d'une arme géniale, technologiquement, mais totalement inutile au niveau opérationnel !)

6) Von Braun aux USA, le triomphe de la raison d'Etat !

En 1945, le père des fusées est exfiltré aux Etats-Unis suite à l’opération Paperclip. Les compétences de l’ancien ingénieur nazi dans le cadre de la future guerre froide contre l’URSS, étaient plus importantes que tout autre considération, notamment sa responsabilité dans l’utilisation d’une main d’œuvre servile pour construire ses fusées ! La raison d’Etat fut plus forte que la justice et alors que les dirigeants nazis furent jugés au procès de Nuremberg, Von Braun échappa au jugement de ses actes !
En 1950, il est nommé directeur technique de l’arsenal Redstone à Huntsville (Alabama) pour la mise au point des missiles guidés. Il est à l’origine du premier missile balistique guidé de l’armée américaine, le Redstone. Il est naturalisé américain en 1955 et devint un véritable héros populaire lorsque Walt Disney l’engage comme collaborateur sur un grand nombre de films éducatifs ayant pour thème le programme spatial américain, dont Man in Space , Man and the Moon en 1955 et Mars and Beyond en 1957.
Nommé directeur des recherches de l’Agence des missiles balistiques de l’armée américaine en 1956, il assure la mise au point des missiles Pershing et Jupiter.
Il entre à la NASA en 1960 et devient directeur du Centre spatial de vol Marshall et dirigera les programmes de vols habités Mercury, Geminiet Apollo. Honoré par le président Jimmy Carter, il s’éteindra le 16 juin 1977, en pleine gloire.
Pourtant, Wernher von Braun a bien appartenu au parti nazi et à la SS. Il a été honoré par Hitler en personne. Les victimes qui furent tuées par les armes de représailles et celles qui trouvèrent la mort dans les camps de concentration de ces armes, étaient sans doute, vu de son laboratoire, rien de moins que le prix à payer.
Von Braun fut l’homme, qui, dans sa vie, ne fit qu’un seul choix : celui des astres aux dépens des hommes.
 
 
 
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Message  

 
 
Von Braun est un personnage ambigu.

Je ne peux pas m'empêcher de penser que sa contribution à la conquête spatiale est immense.

Mais se contribution aux programmes d'armes spéciales de l'Allemagne nazie est immense également.

Le tort de Von Braun est , à mon avis, d'avoir laissé sa passion pour les fusées prendre le pas sur tout le reste. Et d'avoir oblitéré toutes les questions qu'un homme intelligent aurait pu, aurait dû? se poser.

A ce titre, il illustre parfaitement ce que peut devenir la science sans conscience...

_________________

 
 
 
 

Revenir en haut 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

Pierre Durand:
Du nouveau sur le passé nazi de Wernher von Braun

 


.


"

Dans les jours qui suivirent la Libération de Buchenwald, les services de la guerre psychologique de l'armée américaine procédèrent à une vaste enquête sur l'histoire de ce camp de concentration nazi. Un "rapport" fut établi sur la base, notamment, de nombreux témoignages recueillis par une équipe d'anciens détenus sous la direction d'Eugen Kogon, déporté autrichien d'opinions conservatrices. Celui-ci s'en servit pour écrire son livre célèbre "l'Etat SS".

Le rapport lui-même fut considéré comme "secret" par les autorités américaines, échappant ainsi à la curiosité des historiens. Or, il en existait une copie entre les mains du chef de l'équipe américaine des services de renseignements, Albert G. Rosenberg, qui la remit à un professeur de l'université d'El Paso, au Texas, David H. Hackett. Celui-ci vient de la publier intégralement, en expliquant dans sa préface que le secret maintenu jusqu'ici avait été dicté par les besoins de la guerre froide parce que ce rapport établissait sans conteste possible que les communistes - notamment allemands - internés à Buchenwald avaient acquis un mérite éminent dans la défense de leurs camarades de toutes nationalités et avaient dirigé l'insurrection au terme de laquelle les troupes américaines trouvèrent le camp libéré.

Ce texte met ainsi fin à un certain nombre de mensonges et d'erreurs qui ont marqué depuis cinquante ans l'historiographie de Buchenwald. Il n'existe malheureusement, jusqu'ici, qu'en anglais et en allemand1. On sait que c'est dans les tunnels du camp de concentration de Dora, qui dépendit, presque jusqu'à la fin de la guerre, de l'administration SS de Buchenwald, que furent construites, au prix de la vie de plus de 20.000 déportés, les armes secrètes de Hitler dites "V1" et "V2". Le grand patron de cette entreprise criminelle n'était autre que Wernher von Braun, l'homme qui construisit la fusée américaine qui atteignit la Lune.

L'historienne américaine Linda Hundt vient de révéler que von Braun était parfaitement au courant des crimes commis à Dora, qu'il était depuis le début un nazi militant, farouche admirateur de Hitler. Or, les autorités américaines étaient au courant, mais elles ont maintenu le secret dont elles avaient recouvert ce qui, en nom de code, s'appelait "Paperclip", opération consistant à récupérer les savants et les techniciens de l'industrie de guerre pour les besoins des armées des Etats-Unis. C'est ainsi que furent étouffés tous les procès que la justice américaine tenta d'intenter aux criminels de guerre nazis, et que l'on s'efforça de couvrir d'un épais voile de silence ce qui s'était passé à Dora.

Un historien allemand, le professeur Rainer Eisfeld, vient de son côté de publier une biographie de von Braun qui confirme et complète les révélations de Linda Hundt C'est von Braun lui-même qui demanda un rendez-vous à Hitler, qui le reçu, pour lui expliquer qu'il fallait construire des fusées capables de détruire des villes étrangères depuis des pas de tir établis en Allemagne et qu'il se faisait fort de réaliser ce projet. Hitler et ses adjoints décidèrent de l'aider par tous les moyens, notamment en lui fournissant une main-d'oeuvre concentrationnaire qui garderait le secret (puisqu'elle était destinée à périr).

 

PIERRE DURAND

 

 

 

                                                                            Interview de Von Braun  

 

                                                                                                         USA 1960

 

                                                    Von braun 002                                                                  

                                         Clic !!!

 

 

 

 

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "site in construction"

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

Biographie
Naissance
Décès
(à 65 ans)
Alexandria (Virginie)
Sépulture
Ivy Hill Cemetery (en)Voir et modifier les données sur Wikidata
Nationalité
Allemande (1912–1955)
Américaine (1955–1977)
Allégeance
Domiciles
Formation
Activités
Père
Fratrie
Enfant
Margrit von Braun (d)Voir et modifier les données sur Wikidata
Autres informations
A travaillé pour
Domaine
Religions
Luthéranisme (jusqu'en ), évangélisme (à partir de )Voir et modifier les données sur Wikidata
Parti politique
Membre de
Arme
Grade militaire
Conflit
Directeur de thèse
Erich Schumann (en)Voir et modifier les données sur Wikidata
Influencé par
Distinctions
[afficher]Liste détaillée
signature de Wernher von Braun

signature

Wernher Magnus Maximilian von Braun, né le à Wirsitz, en Posnanie, et mort le à Alexandria, en Virginie, est un ingénieur allemand naturalisé américain en 1955 qui a joué un rôle majeur dans le développement des fusées.

En 1930 alors âgé de 18 ans Wernher von Braun rejoint un groupe de passionnés d'astronautique qui au sein de la Verein für Raumschiffahrt met au point de petites fusées expérimentales. Pour poursuivre ses travaux de recherche sur la propulsion à ergols liquides, il accepte de rallier en 1932 le département balistique de la Direction des Armements de l'Armée allemande dirigé par Walter Dornberger. Au sein de cette institution militaire, il prend la tête d'un programme de recherche sur les fusées à propulsion à ergols liquides, qui bénéficie d'un soutien financier croissant des dirigeants militaires allemands dans le contexte d'une politique de réarmement de l'Allemagne portée par l'arrivée au pouvoir de Adolf Hitler. Grâce à ses talents d'organisateur et ses compétences techniques, son équipe d'ingénieurs met au point des fusées de puissance croissante allant de l'A1 à l'A4. Cette dernière, d'une masse de 13 tonnes et dotée d'une portée de plus de 300 km, est conçue dès le départ pour servir de missile balistique avec une charge militaire de plus de 800 kg. Elle effectue son premier vol en 1942 et constitue une avancée majeure par rapport à toutes les fusées développées jusque-là. Sous l'appellation V2 le missile est lancé depuis des rampes mobiles à plusieurs milliers d'exemplaires sur les populations civiles des pays Alliés au cours des deux derniers année de la Seconde Guerre mondiale mais manquant à la fois de précision et de puissance de frappe n'a aucune influence sur le cours de la guerre.

Wernher von Braun est récupéré après la défaite allemande avec les principaux ingénieurs ayant participé au projet V2 par les forces américaines dans le cadre de l'opération Paperclip. Il est placé à la tête d'une équipe constituée principalement d'ingénieurs allemands. Au début des années 1950 l'équipe de von Braun est installée à Huntsville où elle développe les premiers missiles balistiques de l'Armée de terre américaine. Lorsque la course à l'espace est lancée à la fin des années 1950, c'est la fusée Juno I, développée par ses équipes, qui place en orbite le premier satellite artificiel américain Explorer 1. Spécialiste reconnu des lanceurs, il devient responsable du Centre de vol spatial Marshall créé par l'agence spatiale américaine (NASA) pour développer la famille de fusées Saturn. Il joue un rôle pivot dans le développement du lanceur Saturn V qui permettra le lancement des missions lunaires du programme Apollo. À la suite de la réduction du budget alloué au programme spatial américain, il quitte la NASA pour le secteur privé en 1972.

 

Von Braun a eu une relation complexe et ambivalente avec le régime nazi. Il est pour certains hauts dirigeants un modèle et joue un rôle important sans état d'âme dans l'effort de guerre allemand. Il est par ailleurs impossible qu'il ait pu ignorer les conditions de travail inhumaines des déportés chargés de construire les V2 dans les tunnels de Dora, qui ont conduit au décès de milliers d'entre eux.

 

 

Enfance

 

 

                                             Résultat de recherche d'images pour "wernher von braun history of rocketry & space travel"

 

Wernher von Braun naît à Wirsitz (aujourd'hui en Pologne) dans la province de Posnanie qui faisait à l'époque partie de l'Empire allemand. Il est le deuxième des trois fils d'une famille de l'aristocratie allemande portant le titre de baron (Freiherr). Son père Magnus Freiherr von Braun (1878–1972) est un haut fonctionnaire qui fera partie du cabinet du ministère de l'Agriculture sous la République de Weimar. Sa mère Emmy von Quistorp (1886–1959) a une longue ascendance aristocratique. Elle reçut une éducation primaire et secondaire de bonne qualité, notamment encouragée par son père. Elle s'était passionnée pour les sciences naturelles. Elle lui offre son premier télescope[1]. La famille de Wernher déménage à Berlin en 1915 où son père prend un poste au ministère de l'Intérieur. Alors âgé de douze ans, Wernher, qui est inspiré par les records de vitesse établis par Max Valier et Fritz von Opel à l'aide de voitures propulsées par des fusées, crée un incident dans une rue fréquentée avec une voiture jouet auquel il a attaché un certain nombre de feux d'artifice, ce qui lui vaut un court séjour au poste de police. Wernher est un musicien accompli au piano et au violoncelle et peut jouer de mémoire Bach et Beethoven. Il reçoit des leçons du compositeur Paul Hindemith et veut un temps devenir compositeur. En 1925, il rentre dans un internat à Ettersburg près de Weimar où il obtient des notes médiocres en mathématiques et en physique. Il achète à cette époque un exemplaire de l'ouvrage de Die Rakete zu den Planetenräumen (En fusée dans l'espace interplanétaire) du pionnier de l'astronautique allemand Hermann Oberth. En 1928, ses parents le placent dans l'internat Hermann-Lietz dans l'île de Spiekeroog qui fait partie de l'archipel de la Frise-Orientale.

Pionnier de l'astronautique

Comme pour les autres précurseurs de l'astronautique, sa passion pour cette discipline naît de la lecture des écrits et calculs de Constantin Tsiolkovski. Doué en mathématiques, von Braun fait ses études à l’École polytechnique fédérale de Zurich et à l'université technique de Berlin (l’Institut Kaiser-Wilhelm) ou il reçoit son diplôme d'ingénieur en mécanique, tout en consacrant ses loisirs, à partir de 1930, à construire et à expérimenter de petites fusées au sein d'une équipe réunie par le précurseur Hermann Oberth, la VfR, acronyme de Verein für Raumschiffahrt : (« Association pour les voyages dans l'espace »). Les expérimentations ont lieu à Reinickendorf dans Berlin, sur un terrain de cent cinquante hectares, qu'ils baptisent Raketenflugplatz (« aéroport de fusées »).                                         Wvb 11

À partir de 1929, l'Armée de Terre allemande commence à s'intéresser aux fusées. Elle crée un « Bureau des engins balistiques spéciaux » rattaché à la direction de l'armement, dirigé par le colonel Karl Becker et le capitaine Walter Dornberger. Celui-ci est chargé de mettre au point des fusées à propergol solide de 5 à 9 kg et d'effectuer des recherches théoriques sur la propulsion à ergols liquides. Un champ de tir situé à Kummersdorf dans la banlieue de Berlin est utilisé pour effectuer des lancements de roquettes à propergol solide entre 1930 et 1932.Von braun 1 Becker et Dornberger, qui ont suivi les travaux du VfR, concluent au printemps 1932 un accord avec Rudolf Nebel pour que celui-ci effectue un tir de sa fusée Repulsor sur le champ de tir militaire de Kummersdorf contre une rémunération de 1 000 Reichsmark. Le vol qui a lieu en juillet est un demi-succès mais Domberger propose tout de même de subventionner les travaux à condition que ceux-ci soient menés de manière scientifique et que les essais ne soient plus publics[2]. Nebel, bien qu'adhérent de l'association paramilitaire de droite Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten, refuse ces conditions car il se méfie des militaires et entretient des relations difficiles avec Becker[3]. Celui-ci a plus de succès lorsqu'il effectue la même proposition à Van Braun qui a participé aux négociations entre Nebel et les militaires. Becker propose de financer une thèse de von Braun sur la propulsion à ergols liquides, à condition que les essais des fusées issues de ces travaux se déroulent à Kummersdorf. En novembre 1932, von Braun et le mécanicien Heinrich Grünow commencent le développement d'une nouvelle fusée. Trois mois plus tard, ils font fonctionner durant 60 secondes sur banc d'essais un moteur à ergols liquides d'une poussée de 103 kilogrammes brûlant un mélange d'oxygène liquide et d'alcool. Un deuxième moteur, refroidi par circulation d'alcool et fournissant une poussée triple, fonctionne quelques mois plus tard

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "wernher von braun history of rocketry & space travel"

 

Au service de l'armée allemande

 
Von Braun (en civil) en 1941 à Peenemünde (Allemagne) en compagnie de plusieurs officiers engagés dans le programme des missiles V2.

Le , von Braun remet sa thèse de doctorat sur la propulsion des fusées, intitulée Solutions théoriques et expérimentales au problème des fusées propulsées par des carburants liquides. Technique des fusées et recherche dans le domaine du vol spatial. Classée confidentielle, elle n'est publiée qu'en 1960[4]. Longue, et périlleuse, avec les matériaux de l'époque, la mise au point d'un moteur-fusée à propergols (carburant et comburant) liquides est menée en collaboration avec le Dr Thiel. En 1934, Wernher von Braun lance de l'île de Borkum, en mer du Nord, deux exemplaires (Max et Moritz) de la fusée A2 (Aggregat 2)[5] dont le moteur développe une tonne de poussée. Elles atteignent l'altitude de 2 200 mètres. En , le groupe de von Braun reçoit 5 millions de marks de la Luftwaffe et 6 millions de l'armée pour développer un moteur-fusée.

Début 1936, von Braun se rend sur la côte de la Poméranie à la recherche d'un terrain d'essais pour fusée. Il le trouve à Peenemünde, dans l'île d'Usedom.

 

 

L'équipe de von Braun a besoin d'un terrain au bord de la Mer Baltique pour tirer le long des côtes et installer des bases de mesure. Le , lors d'une conférence, la décision d'acquérir le terrain d'Usedom est entérinée. Le soir même, le maire de la commune signe l'acte d'achat qui comprend le déplacement des habitants. La construction du centre d'essais démarre en [6].

La mise au point du missile balistique V2

 
V2, quatre secondes après le décollage depuis le banc d'essai VII du centre de recherches balistiques de Peenemünde, le 21 juin 1943.

En 1937, toujours pour obtenir davantage de moyens, il adhère au parti nazi, le NSDAP. Von Braun reconnaîtra après-guerre avoir personnellement rencontré Hitler à trois reprises : la première fois au centre d'essais de Kummersdorf en 1934, et deux autres fois à Berlin au cours de l'année 1942[7]. Il est nommé directeur technique du centre d'essais de Peenemünde et assure entre 1939 et 1942 la mise au point de la fusée A4 (Aggregat 4) qui, utilisée comme arme, prendra le nom de V2 (V pour Vergeltungswaffe « arme de représailles ») et dont plus de 3 000 exemplaires seront lancés principalement sur l'Angleterre (Londres), la Belgique (Anvers, Liège, Bruxelles) et les Pays-Bas (la Haye) en 1944 et 1945.

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "peenemünde fusée v2"

 

En 1944, il est décoré de la croix du Mérite de guerre Adulé par le régime — Hitler voit en lui le type du surhomme aryen — il est promu trois fois par Himmler, la dernière fois, en , comme SS-Sturmbannführer . En 1943, Hitler donne la priorité absolue au programme des fusées A4. La fabrication des V2 s'intensifie et leur construction commence à utiliser des déportés des camps de Dora-Mittelbau et Buchenwald. Von Braun appartient à l'équipe dirigeante des spécialistes des fusées, supervisant les ingénieurs, les travailleurs civils et les déportés de Dora.

 

                                                  Wernhert von braun

 

 

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "peenemünde fusée v2"

 

 

Wvb 2

 

Wvb 3

 

 

Wvb 4

 

 

Wvb 5

 

 

Wvb 6

 

 

                          Wvb 8

 

 

                                  Wvb 9

 

 

 

Wvb 10

 

 

 

 

 

Wvb 12

 

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.
 
Peenemünde
La gare de Peenemünde.
La gare de Peenemünde.
Blason de Peenemünde
Héraldique
Administration
Pays Drapeau de l'Allemagne Allemagne
Land Flag of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania.svg Mecklembourg-Poméranie-Occidentale
Arrondissement
(Landkreis)
Poméranie-Occidentale-Greifswald
Bourgmestre
(Bürgermeister)
Rainer Barthelmes
Code postal 17449
Code communal
(Gemeindeschlüssel)
13 0 75 106
Indicatif téléphonique 038371
Immatriculation OVP
Démographie
Population 326 hab. (31 décembre 2010)
Densité 13 hab./km2
Géographie
Coordonnées 54° 08′ 00″ nord, 13° 46′ 00″ est
Altitude 3 m
Superficie 2 497 ha = 24,97 km2
Localisation

Géolocalisation sur la carte : Allemagne

Voir la carte topographique d'Allemagne
City locator 14.svg
Peenemünde
Liens
Site web www.amt-usedom-nord.de [archive]
 
 
Situation de Peenemünde dans l'arrondissement de Poméranie-Occidentale-Greifswald
 
(de gauche à droite) Le général Emil Leeb, Heinrich Lübke et (?), en arrière-plan, Fritz Todt, Walter Dornberger, à Peenemünde le 21 mars 1941 (archives allemandes)

Peenemünde est un petit port d'Allemagne situé dans l'arrondissement de Poméranie-Occidentale-Greifswald et le Land de Mecklembourg-Poméranie-Occidentale.

 

Sommaire

 [masquer

Géographie

Peenemünde est la commune la plus septentrionale de l'île de Usedom. Elle est située au nord-ouest de la station balnéaire de Karlshagen, à l'estuaire du Peenestrom.

Histoire

Le petit port a été mentionné pour la première fois en 1284. Le roi Gustave-Adolphe de Suède y a débarqué à la tête de quinze mille hommes au début de la Guerre de Trente Ans, le 26 juin 1630. Il prend rapidement toute la baie et la région environnante. La paix de Westphalie (1648) l'attribue, comme toute la province, à la Poméranie suédoise.

Base militaire allemande

Ancien site militaire de recherche de l'armée allemande, la base de Peenemünde était à la fois, entre 1936 et 1943, un centre de fabrication et un site d'essais de missiles.

Il a produit les bombes volantes allemandes (V1, V2) dirigé par Walter Dornberger pour le V2 et la Luftwaffe pour le V1.

En Allemagne, pendant la République de Weimar, à la fin des années 1920, les amateurs de fusées sont nombreux. Ils se retrouvent sur un terrain militaire, loué par la ville de Berlin, situé à Tegel. Vers 1930, grâce à de nouveaux produits et matériaux (aluminium, oxygène liquide...), ils expérimentent de petits moteurs-fusées. La crise économique stoppe leurs projets. Parmi ces passionnés se trouve Wernher von Braun. C'est lui qui trouve le terrain idéal en l’île d’Usedom, située sur la mer Baltique, pour les essais des fusées A1, A2, A3, A4, A5... Ces tests serviront de base pour le futur V2.

En mars 1936, l'armée de terre confirme son financement du centre de recherche. Le 1er avril, la Luftwaffe annonce sa participation au projet. Dès août 1936, d'immenses travaux commencent et les premiers ateliers sont opérationnels le 1er mai 1937. Wernher Von Braun est nommé directeur technique du centre de recherche de l'armée de terre. Tous les travaux ont été réalisés par des prisonniers.

Il y a deux camps de travail. Le premier, le hall F1 : les prisonniers dorment au rez-de-chaussée et travaillent dans les étages pour la fabrication en série des fusées A4.

Le deuxième camp est installé près de l’aérodrome. Les prisonniers travaillent à l’aérodrome en effectuant des travaux de terrassement et de camouflage, ainsi que le réapprovisionnement des avions en essence. Ils ramassent, dans les marais, les pistons de la catapulte de tir de la rampe de lancement Walther, après les lancements des bombes volantes V1.

Les deux camps dépendaient du camp de concentration de Ravensbrück. Le Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler visite Peenemünde en avril 1943.

En Angleterre, Reginald Victor Jones identifie une fusée sur une photo aérienne de Peenemünde. Dans la nuit du 17 au 18 août 1943, la RAF bombarde massivement le centre de recherches (opération Hydra) causant la mort d’environ 600 personnes.

Le bombardement de Peenemünde a plusieurs conséquences. Les essais seront désormais faits à Blizna en Pologne occupée (gouvernement général).

Une usine souterraine, dénommée « Mittelwerk » (« usine du centre »), est aménagée en Thuringe, près de Nordhausen : c'est le camp de concentration de Dora. Les travaux d’aménagement y débutent le 28 août 1943 avec l’arrivée à Nordhausen d’un premier groupe de déportés venus de Peenemünde par Buchenwald, pour former un Kommando de travail, baptisé « Dora ».

En février 1945, devant l'avance des forces alliées et plus particulièrement de celles de l'armée soviétique, le régime nazi décide d'évacuer et de dynamiter le centre de recherches.

Peu avant la capitulation sans condition de l'armée allemande, Wernher von Braun organise sa fuite vers l'Ouest et négocie son départ vers les États-Unis (voir opération Paperclip). Des 500 membres de son équipe, les Soviétiques ne saisiront que Helmut Gröttrup, responsable du système de guidage des missiles.

Opération Hydra

L'opération Hydra fut préparée en Angleterre. À h le , 598 bombardiers Avro Lancaster, Halifax et Stirling du Wing Commander J. H. Searby, partis la veille à 22 h d’Angleterre, frappèrent la base de Peenemünde. La pleine lune permit aux avions de frapper les cibles désignées par les rapports et photos aériennes. La surprise des Allemands fut complète, mais les escadrilles de protection venant de Berlin arrivèrent rapidement sur les lieux et les pertes alliées furent lourdes (40 bombardiers abattus).

Une erreur dans l'emploi des fusées colorées de marquage des cibles diminua notablement l'efficacité finale du raid en attirant le gros du bombardement sur les baraquements de Trassenheide abritant la main d'œuvre concentrationnaire (dont émanait une partie des renseignements parvenue aux services de renseignement scientifiques dirigés par R.V.Jones).

Toutefois le bilan fut positif pour les Alliés :

  • 1 900 tonnes de bombes dont 300 tonnes de bombes incendiaires furent larguées
  • Le général von Chamier-Gliczinski, directeur de Peenemünde, fut tué
  • L'ingénieur Walter Thiel, un des hommes clés du projet V2, spécialiste de la mise au point des moteurs fusée à combustible liquide fut tué avec toute sa famille.
  • Le général Jeschonek, chef d’état major de la Wehrmacht, paraît également avoir été parmi les victimes (selon d’autres sources, il se serait suicidé après le raid)
  • 500 techniciens des armes V et de nombreux experts en disciplines auxiliaires telles que l’électronique furent également tués
  • Des modèles, des maquettes, tous les plans et une grande partie de l’outillage de production furent détruits.

Cette attaque a vraisemblablement préservé Londres et les ports de débarquement d'un « rideau de pluie » de V1.

Dans son livre Most secret War le responsable du renseignement scientifique britannique R.V. Jones estime que l'opération Hydra fit perdre aux Allemands six à huit semaines dans la course à la mise en œuvre opérationnelle des V1 et V2. Ce délai fut critique pour lancer sans encombre les préparatifs du débarquement de Normandie de juin 1944.

 

Wvb 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vb 100

Martin Schilling, Wernher von Braun, Ernst Steinhoff inspect V-2 rocket motor, White Sands, NM, 1946

 

 

 

 

Wvb 16

 

 

Paper clip

 

 

V2 Rocket DevelopmentPeenemündeFort Bliss

Part 1 > Wernher von Braun – Part 2

GERMANY’S V2 ROCKET

Peenemünde and the V2
From 1937 to 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun was the technical director for the German army’s new rocket test facility (Heeresversuchsanstalt) at Peenemünde on the Baltic island of Usedom. It was here on the isolated north German coast that von Braun and his team would develop the world’s first ballistic missile, the A4, later known as the V2. The Nazi German military poured money and people into the rocket effort, and soon the new testing facility would swallow up and spread beyond what was once a small fishing village known as Peenemünde (“mouth of the Peene river”) on the northwestern tip of Usedom.

Peenemuende tracks

Part of the Peenemünde complex as it looks today. In his first two years here, Wernher von Braun often traveled by train between his home in Zinnowitz and his offices in Peenemünde. PHOTO: Hyde Flippo

Although it was not public knowledge during most of von Braun’s heyday in the US, we now know that he joined the NSDAP (Nazi party) on 1 December 1938. In May 1940 he joined the SS, eventually achieving the rank of Sturmbannführer (equal to the army rank of major). Despite that, in March 1944 Himmler’s Gestapo accused von Braun of treason (and the intention of escaping to England). He was arrested and spent time in jail, only being released because of his special status and the intervention of his boss Walter Dornberger and armaments minister Albert Speer.

At the ever-expanding Peenemünde facility, and later at the notorious underground Dora (Mittelwerk) complex near Nordhausen in the Harz mountains, von Braun and his team developed the V2 (Vergeltungswaffe 2), the world’s first liquid-fueled ballistic rocket weapon. The first successful test firing of the V2 took place on 3 October 1942 at the Peenemünde site. The V2 carried a 2,000-pound (980 kg) warhead and had an operational range of 320 km (about 200 mi). (There were plans for longer range rockets that could cross the Atlantic and strike the USA, but they were never developed.) The first V2 to be used against the Allies took off for London on 7 September 1944 (flight time: 320 seconds, about 5 minutes). Eventually over 3,000 V2s were launched against targets in England, Belgium, France, and the Netherlands. (More V2s struck Antwerp [1610] than London [1358].) An estimated 8,000 people, most of them in Antwerp and London, died in the V2 attacks. Another 12,000 people or more, mostly slave-labor prisoners, died as a result of the horrible working and living conditions at the Mittelwerk V2 plant. Although von Braun had no direct control over Mittelwerk, he was well aware of the deplorable situation there and at the Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp. He later admitted shame that such things could happen in Germany, even in war.

W. von Braun at Peenemünde

Wernher von Braun (in business suit) at the Peenemünde V2 test complex in spring 1941. PHOTO: Bundesarchiv

As a rocket, the V2 (A4) was a major success. As a destructive weapon, the V2 was less successful. For its massive development costs, each V2 yielded only modest destruction and an average of two deaths per V2 rocket fired. (This was in part due to many V2s missing their targets.) Despite a few rare “successes,” including a V2 strike on a Woolworth’s store in New Cross, England (160 deaths) and another that hit a packed cinema in Antwerp (567 deaths), in the end the V2 was not really the “miracle weapon” (Wunderwaffe) that Hitler had promised the Germans. Its military value was modest. A V2’s explosive power was only half of a single B-17’s 4,000 lb (1814 kg) bomb load dropped during a typical Allied raid. More people died making the V2 than in actual V2 attacks. The terror effect of the V2 only made the Allies more determined to defeat the Germans.

Going over to the Americans: Operation Paperclip
When the war ended in 1945, von Braun and most members of his team decided they wanted to work for the Americans rather than the Soviets, who were also actively trying to get former German rocket engineers. To avoid the Russians, von Braun and about 500 team members traveled south to Bavaria, which was an American occupation zone. Wernher’s brother Magnus was chosen to contact the Americans because he spoke the best English. On 3 May 1945, in Reutte, Austria, just across the border from Bavaria, von Braun and his team surrendered to US Army officers. (Photo in Part 1.)

As part of what was dubbed “Operation Paperclip,” von Braun and over 100 of his contingent were sent to the United States in late 1945 and early 1946. The German rocket team was first assigned to Fort Bliss in Texas and the nearby White Sands Proving Grounds in New Mexico, where they helped test several captured V2 rockets.

Paperclip team Fort Bliss

Most of the “Operation Paperclip” team of German scientists under Wernher von Braun were sent to Fort Bliss, Texas. This photo was taken in 1946. Wernher von Braun is standing in the front row, seventh from the right. PHOTO: NASA

Dr. von Braun began his work in Texas with a supersonic ramjet project (first named “Comet” and later “Hermes”) while assigning some of his team to work on getting rusty recovered V2 rockets ready for testing at White Sands. At first, the Fort Bliss scientists were alone, with their wives and families still in occupied Germany. This, combined with a lack of financial and technical support from the army, soon led to a crisis in the group’s morale. Conditions later improved and von Braun began to feel more at home in his new country. It was during this time that von Braun, raised as a Lutheran in Germany, converted to evangelical Protestantism as a member of a small Texas church.

In December 1946, von Braun and his team gained some fame when the War Department finally announced their presence in the United States. The El Paso Times headline read: “118 Top German V-2 Experts Stationed in E.P.” Von Braun was in New York on business when the story broke. Pictures of the young German scientist appeared in major American newspapers and Life magazine. But the Germans would become frustrated by a lack of funding and support for advanced guided missile development during the Fort Bliss years. It would take the Korean War to finally get the US truly interested in turning the V2 into an advanced

 

L'opération Paperclip

 
Von Braun le , juste après s'être livré à l'armée américaine.

Vers l'automne 1944, les ingénieurs et scientifiques de l'industrie militaire comprennent que la défaite est inéluctable et von Braun voit son avenir de scientifique en Allemagne sérieusement compromis[10]. Fils de directeur de coopérative et politicien de droite, élevé dans l'exécration du communisme, Wernher Von Braun choisit, après quelques hésitations, l'Amérique.

Mais la SS est chargée de prévenir toute fuite de cerveaux allemands, et ordre est donné d'éliminer ceux qui tentent de fuir. Dans les derniers jours d', von Braun, blessé quelques semaines plus tôt dans un accident de voiture, réussit avec une grande partie de son équipe d'ingénieurs et de techniciens de haut niveau (une centaine de personnes) à échapper à la surveillance des commandos SS après s'être caché dans des grottes. Le , dans une station de ski bavaroise, il se rend aux alliés à la suite du contact établi par son frère Magnus avec le soldat de seconde classe Schweikert qui participait à une patrouille avancée américaine. Le savant et son équipe seront ensuite récupérés par les Américains dans le cadre de l'opération Paperclip[11].

Le , von Braun arrive aux États-Unis. Il traverse alors une période d'inactivité pendant laquelle les différentes composantes de l'armée américaine se disputent la filière de développement des missiles balistiques. Durant cette période, les services secrets lui assignent deux hommes en permanence pour le garder et l'assister dans ses actes de la vie quotidienne en Amérique[12] : il est soigneusement gardé en réserve. Finalement, von Braun et les scientifiques de son équipe sont transférés à Fort Bliss au Texas, une vaste base militaire de l'armée de terre : c'est donc la composante armée de terre des Forces armées des États-Unis qui développera la filière. Les domaines de compétence qui lui sont assignés sont : la poursuite des travaux allemands portant sur les missiles intermédiaires A9 et A10 (en) pour développer un IRBM, un ICBM et un lanceur.

Pendant son séjour à Fort Bliss, von Braun envoie une demande en mariage à sa jeune cousine, Maria Luise von Quistorp (née le ). Autorisé à retourner en Allemagne, Wernher von Braun l'épouse le en l'église luthérienne de Landshut. Le couple revient à New York, avec les parents de Maria, le . Il aura trois enfants : Iris (1948), Margrit (1952) et Peter (1960) von Braun. Le , von Braun acquiert la nationalité américaine.

Responsable du programme de missiles balistiques de l'armée américaine

 

 

                                                                  

                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                 

 

                                                                                                 
 
Von Braun, directeur du centre de vol spatial de la NASA, mai 1964.

En 1950, il est nommé directeur technique du Redstone Arsenal établissement de l'Armée de terre américaine situé à Huntsville (Alabama) pour la mise au point de missiles guidés. Il est à l'origine du missile Redstone, dérivé directement du V2 allemand, et premier missile balistique guidé de l'armée américaine, qui sera utilisé en 1961 pour le lancement des premiers astronautes américains. Il est nommé directeur des recherches de l'Agence pour les missiles balistiques de l'Armée de terre américaine en 1956. Il assure la mise au point des missiles Pershing et Jupiter.

 
Von Braun (avec les jumelles au cou) et ses principaux collaborateurs après le lancement réussi de la fusée Apollo 11.

Au milieu des années 1950, il collabore avec Walt Disney à un grand nombre de films éducatifs ayant pour thème le programme spatial américain, pour tenter de populariser le rêve de l'aventure spatiale : Man in Space et Man and the Moon en 1955, puis Mars and Beyond en 1957. Ces films attirèrent l'attention non seulement du public, mais aussi des responsables du programme spatial soviétique. Dès 1954, Wernher von Braun expose à l'American Rocket Society un projet de mise en orbite d'un satellite artificiel, en utilisant comme lanceur le missile Redstone ; l'armée de terre, dont dépend von Braun, soutient l'idée, et lance sur cette base le projet Orbiter.

Mais le président Eisenhower ne place pas l'astronautique dans les priorités de son programme, et ne souhaite pas, en outre, que le lancement du premier satellite américain soit confié à une équipe majoritairement allemande. Le projet Orbiter est donc abandonné en août 1955, au profit du Programme Vanguard, un programme concurrent qui dépend de la marine. Il faudra le succès de l'astronautique soviétique avec le lancement du premier satellite artificiel Spoutnik 1, le , et l'échec cuisant du lancement du satellite TV-3 par la marine américaine et son lanceur Vanguard, le , pour que von Braun revienne sur le devant de la scène, en prenant une part décisive dans le lancement du premier satellite artificiel américain (Explorer 1).

 

 

Carrière à la NASA : le développement de la fusée Saturn V

 

 

                                                  Résultat de recherche d'images pour "saturn 5"                                      

 

 

 
Wernher von Braun devant les moteurs F-1 du premier étage de la fusée Saturn V.

En 1958, l'agence spatiale américaine NASA est fondée pour fédérer les efforts de recherche spatiale américains. Von Braun est nommé directeur du centre de vol spatial Marshall de l'agence (Huntsville, Alabama) et conservera ce poste stratégique jusqu'en 1970. Il participe aux programmes de vols habités Mercury et Gemini. Lorsque le Programme Apollo est lancé par le président américain John Kennedy en 1961, von Braun prend en charge la conception de la fusée géante Saturn V, qui jouera un rôle essentiel dans la réussite des missions lunaires américaines.

Responsable des programmes jusqu'en 1970, il devient administrateur adjoint de la NASA cette même année. Mais, très vite, il est en désaccord avec les nouvelles orientations de l'agence : von Braun souhaite poursuivre l'exploration spatiale vers Mars, alors que la priorité est désormais donnée à la mise au point de la navette spatiale.

En 1972, il quitte la NASA et devient directeur adjoint de la société Fairchild Engine & Airplane Corporation. En 1975, il reçoit la National Medal of Science[13]. Le , il décède des suites d'un cancer du foie à Alexandria (Virginie). Le premier vol de la navette spatiale Enterprise, prévu le jour même, a été reporté au lendemain à la suite de cet événement.

Relation avec le nazisme

Von Braun a eu une relation complexe et ambivalente avec le régime nazi[14]. Il est devenu par commodité, dit-il, membre du NSADP le sous le no 5 738 692[15]:96. Reçu et félicité par Hitler en personne, il rejoint en 1940 la SS avec le grade de "Untersturmführer" (Second lieutenant) et le no 185 068  : après trois promotions il finira en SS-Sturmbannführer (Major). Il prétend l'avoir fait par nécessité pour pouvoir continuer ses recherches d'ingénieur et affirme n'avoir porté que quelques fois l'uniforme SS, mais des témoins de Peenemünde le contestent[16]. Il existe d'ailleurs une photo où il est en uniforme SS aux côtés d'Himmler[17]. Il s'est dit aussi ignorant des conditions de travail inhumaines des déportés dans les tunnels de Peenemünde du Camp de concentration de Dora ce qui est une invraisemblance manifeste. Après certaines tensions avec la Gestapo qui craint son départ pour l'Angleterre en , il rentre en grâce et reçoit la Croix du Mérite de guerre le . Il ne se livrera aux Américains qu'après la mort d'Hitler le .

La fabrication des V2 fera plus de morts (plus de 20 000 prisonniers ont perdu la vie à Dora) que leur utilisation comme arme[18]. Dans son livre autobiographique, Wernher von Braun n'admet pas de responsabilité, minimisant sa position dans le camp. Il affirmera toujours n'avoir rien su de la souffrance des déportés et des morts de Dora-Mittelbau. D'après le Hollandais Albert van Dijk, survivant du camp, cette ignorance est invraisemblable. Tom Gehrels, astronome néerlando-américain, membre de la résistance néerlandaise pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale a interrogé des prisonniers survivants. Il affirme dans la revue Nature à l'occasion d'un commentaire sur un ouvrage faisant référence à von Braun que ce dernier ne pouvait ignorer la situation des déportés : « Von Braun arrivait le matin accompagné d'une femme non identifiée, il devait enjamber les corps des prisonniers morts et passer sous d'autres corps suspendus à une grue »[19],[20].

Dans De l'université aux camps de concentration, Charles Sadron[21], scientifique déporté à Dora en février 1944, a écrit, concernant Wernher von Braun :

« Je dois, cependant, satisfaire à la vérité en signalant que j'ai rencontré un homme qui a eu, vis-à-vis de moi, une attitude presque généreuse. Il s'agit du Professeur von Braun, l'un des membres de l'état-major technique qui mit au point les torpilles aériennes. Von Braun est venu me voir à l'atelier. C'est un homme jeune, d'aspect très germanique, et qui parle parfaitement le français. Il m'a exprimé, en termes courtois et mesurés, son regret de voir un professeur français dans un tel état de misère, puis il m'a proposé de venir travailler dans son laboratoire. Certes, il ne peut être question pour moi d'accepter. Je refuse brutalement. Von Braun s'excuse et sourit en s'éloignant. J'apprendrai plus tard qu'en dépit de mon refus il aura essayé quand même plusieurs fois d'améliorer mon sort, en vain d'ailleurs. »

Lorsque Charles Sadron parle de son « atelier », il s'agit des tunnels dans lesquels travaillaient, vivaient dans des conditions inhumaines et mouraient beaucoup de déportés.

Ouvrages

En 1958, Wernher von Braun a publié à New York First Men to the Moon aux éditions Holt, Rinehart & Winston. Cet ouvrage a été traduit en français par Catherine Imbert et publié en 1961 sous le nom Les premiers hommes sur la Lune aux éditions Albin Michel (89 pages).

Citations

Dans son ouvrage History of rocketry & space travel, W. von Braun expose sa foi dans la conquête spatiale :

« Pendant la Renaissance, le prince Henri le Navigateur du Portugal a établi dans son château de Sagres ce qui ressemble le plus étroitement à ce que la NASA essaye d'accomplir à notre époque. Il a systématiquement rassemblé des cartes, des architectures de bateau et des instruments de navigation du monde entier ; il a attiré à lui les marins les plus expérimentés du Portugal. Il a mis au point un programme progressif visant à l'exploration de la côte atlantique de l'Afrique et la découverte de l'extrémité la plus méridionale de ce continent, qu'il savait devoir être contournée si l'on voulait atteindre l'Inde par la mer. Avec la même résolution il a travaillé à établir, pour aller vers l'Extrême-Orient, un itinéraire, sans doute plus court, qui partait vers l'ouest. Le Prince Henri a formé les astronautes de son temps, des hommes comme Ferdinand Magellan et Vasco de Gama, et il a créé l'environnement qui, de l'Espagne voisine, a lancé Christophe Colomb dans son voyage historique. »

« L'Europe médiévale repliée sur elle-même a été par la suite transformée en un continent ouvert, tendu vers l'exploration et le développement. L'Angleterre est devenue un endroit différent après que des hommes comme Sir Francis Drake ou Sir Walter Raleigh ont suivi les pas des navigateurs portugais et espagnols. Comme résultat direct de cette époque d'exploration qui a ouvert leurs yeux et a amélioré leurs modes de vie, les Européens et leur descendance américaine ont depuis lors mené le monde dans un dynamisme intellectuel. »

« Il aurait été difficile pour Henri le Navigateur de répondre à une demande de justification de ses actions sur une base rationnelle ou de prévoir le profit ou la rentabilité de son programme d'exploration. Il a accompli un acte de foi et le monde est devenu plus riche et plus beau grâce à ce programme. L'exploration de l'espace est le défi de notre époque. Si nous continuons à mettre notre foi en elle et à la poursuivre, elle nous en récompensera généreusement. »

« À une époque la Chine a eu une flotte à la fois marchande mais aussi d'exploration qui a rejeté ses rivaux dans l'ombre. Ils l'ont délibérément abandonnée et ont alors stagné pendant plusieurs centaines d'années. Une société moderne ne peut pas se permettre de stagner de la même manière. »

« Nous pouvons arriver à vaincre la pesanteur. Pas la paperasserie »

« J'ai appris à employer le mot “impossible” avec la plus grande prudence. »

« La fusée a parfaitement fonctionné si l’on fait abstraction du fait qu’elle n’a pas atterri sur la bonne planète. »

Galerie

Voir aussi

Bibliographie

  • W. Dornberger, L'Arme secrète de Peenemünde, éd. J'ai lu no 122, 123 1970
  • James Mc Govern La Chasse aux armes secrètes allemandes, éd. J'ai lu no 176, 1970
  • W. von Braun & F.I. Ordway III, History of rocketry & space travel, NY Thomas Y. Crowell 3e édition révisée, 1975 (ISBN 978-0-06-181898-1) (ISBN 978-0-06-181898-1)
  • Pierre Kohler et Jean-René Germain, Von Braun contre Korolev : duel pour la conquête de l'espace, Paris, Plon, , 277 p. (ISBN 978-2-259-02749-6, OCLC 31027065)
  • (en) M.J. Neufeld, The Rocket and the Reich: Peenemunde and the Coming of the Ballistic Missile Era, Smithsonian Books, , 400 p. (ISBN 978-1588344670)
  • Rainer Eisfeld, Mondsüchtig: Wernher von Braun und die Geburt der Raumfahrt aus dem Geist der Barbarei, Reinbek bei Hamburg, Rowohlt.
  • (en) Michael J Neufeld, Von Braun : dreamer of space, engineer of war, New York, Vintage Books, , 587 p. (ISBN 978-0-307-38937-4, OCLC 269804626)
  • (en) Michael J. Neufeld, The rocket and the Reich : Peenemünde and the coming of the ballistic missile era, New York, Free Press, , 368 p. (ISBN 978-0-029-22895-1, OCLC 30913559, lire en ligne [archive])
  • Gregory P. Kennedy, Vengeance Weapon 2: The V-2 Guided Missile, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington DC, 1983, (ISBN 978-0-87474-573-3 et 0-87474-573-X)
    Traduit en français par X. de Megille, Le V2 arme de Vengeance, Éditions du Blockhaus, 62910 Eperlecques
  • Olivier Huwart, Du V2 à Véronique : la naissance des fusées françaises, Rennes, Marines éditions, , 189 p. (ISBN 978-2-915-37919-8 et 2-915-37919-X, OCLC 57636921)
  • Linda Hunt (trad. Yves Béon), L'Affaire Paperclip : la récupération des scientifiques nazis par les Américains, 1945-1990 [« Secret agenda »], Paris, Stock, , 463 p. (ISBN 978-2-234-04351-0, OCLC 32832084, notice BnF no FRBNF36684055)
  • Oriana Fallaci, Se il sole muore, Rizzoli (littéralement : Si le soleil meurt), 1965, réédité en 1994 aux éditions Rizzoli
  • (en) Guido Knopp, Hitlers Manager, München, C. Bertelsmann, , 415 p. (ISBN 978-3-570-00701-3, OCLC 56755344)
  • Charles Sadron, De l'université aux camps de concentration - Témoignages strasbourgeois, Presses universitaires de Strasbourg, 1947 - ouvrage collectif.
  • Stefan Brauburger et Gundula Bavendamm (trad. Georges Wcislo), Wernher von Braun entre nazisme et rêves de fusées [« Wernher von Braun : Ein deutsches Genie zwischen Unterganagwahn und Raketenträumen »], Paris Bruxelles, Jourdan Éditeur, , 314 p. (ISBN 978-2-874-66121-1, OCLC 690875054)
  • Michel Rival, Les apprentis sorciers : Haber, von Braun, Teller, Paris, Seuil, coll. « Science ouverte », , 234 p. (ISBN 978-2-020-21515-2, OCLC 35713705)
  • (en) Michael Brian Petersen, Engineering consent: Peenemümde, National-socialism and the V2 missile, 1924-1945, , 451 p. (lire en ligne [archive])

Articles connexes

Liens externes

Sur les autres projets Wikimedia :

Notes et références

  1. Marianne J. Dyson, « Space and Astronomy: Decade by Decade » [archive].
  2. a et b J. Bersani et all, Le grand Atlas de l'espace, Encyclopaedia Universalis, (ISBN 2-85229-911-9), p. 33-35
  3. (en) M.J. Neufeld, Von Braun: Dreamer of Space, Engineer of War, Knopf, (ISBN 978-0-307-26292-9), p. 50-53
  4. « Konstruktive, theoretische und experimentelle Beiträge zu dem Problem der Flüssigkeitsrakete ». Raketentechnik und Raumfahrtforschung, Sonderheft 1 (1960), Stuttgart, Allemagne.
  5. Stefan Brauburger, Von Braun, entre nazisme et rêves de fusées, Paris-Bruxelles, Jourdan éditions, 2010, p. 53-54.
  6. Stefan Brauburger, Von Braun, entre nazisme et rêves de fusées, Paris-Bruxelles, Jourdan éditions, 2010, p. 60-61.
  7. Selon Ruth von Saurma, responsable des relations publiques de la Rocket Team dans les années 1950 et 1960, et traductrice personnelle de von Braun.
  8. Tibor Iván Berend, Histoire économique de l'Europe du XXe siècle, Boeck Supérieur, , 336 p. (ISBN 9782804158743, lire en ligne [archive]).
  9. (en) von Braun, Wernher [archive] sur www.astronautix.com. 1943 June 28 Von Braun promoted to SS Sturmbannfuehrer.
  10. « We despise the French; we are dealthy afraid of the Russians; we don't think that the British can afford us; so all we have left are the Americans. » Reiner Eisfeld.
  11. Linda Hunt, L'Affaire Paperclip.
  12. Lire le témoignage de l'un de ces gardiens dans le livre de Studs Terkel : La Bonne Guerre - Histoires orales de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.
  13. (en) « The President's National Medal of Science: Recipient Details » [archive], sur nsf.gov (consulté le 17 décembre 2014).
  14. Fiche FBI de 1961 : ATOMIC ENERGY ACT - APPLICANT pages 26-27« Applicant was member of NSDAP in Germany through necessity was never active in Party; was also officer in SS but more in nature of honorary commission; was never active in either SS or NSADP. » Wernher von Braun FBI file [archive].
  15. (en) Michael Neufeld, Von Braun Dreamer of Space Engineer of War, New York, Alfred A. Knopf, (ISBN 978-0-307-26292-9).
  16. "Dr. Space" pp. 35 [archive] "It had been thought that he publicly wore his uniform with swastika armband just once, during one of two formal..."
  17. Photo en uniforme SS [1] [archive].
  18. (en) Mittelbau Overview [archive], v2rocket.com.
  19. (en) « The Rocket Man's Dark Side » [archive], sur Time (magazine), tuesday, mar. 26, 2002.
  20. Of Truth and Consequences, Tom Gehrels (1994). Nature no 372, p. 511-512.
  21. Charles Sadron, professeur à la Faculté des sciences de l'université de Strasbourg, repliée en à Clermont-Ferrand, est arrêté le (rafle de Clermont-Ferrand) et déporté à Buchenwald en et à Dora en . Il consacre un chapitre de 54 pages à sa déportation à Dora sous le titre « À l'usine de Dora. ».

 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday, July 21, 2013
 

Wernher von Braun: The Father of the Ballistic Missile

 
 
One of the mainstays of the Cold War was the employment on both sides of the Iron Curtain of massive numbers of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles more commonly called ICBMs for short. Upon notification at the push of a button, a weapon can be launched utilizing rocket technology to propel a potentially destructive warhead on a one way trip anywhere on the globe to deliver a destructive message upon the enemy. The threat of nuclear destruction from the heavens was the stuff of nightmares but yet an ever present danger in throughout the years of the Cold War. Each side was always trying to best the other. Rocketry has become a weapon of war on a scale never seen before capable of not only breaching the outer perimeters of our atmosphere but also in propelling weaponry at speeds inconceivable years before at such great distances that detection or interception is difficult. The development of the ICBM is derived of technology envisioned decades earlier as the brainchild of one man. His name was Wernher von Braun.
 
Born Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun in Wirsitz, in the province of Posen at the time part of the German Empire on 23 March 1912, Wernher was the second of three sons born to a Magnus Freiherr von Braun and Emmy von Quistorp. He was born into an aristocratic family thus inheriting the title of Freiherr or 'Baron' and he could trace his family heritage to medieval European royalty as a descendant of Phillip III of France, Valdemar I of Denmark, Robert III of Scotland, Edward III of England, Mieszko I of Poland and ultimately Charlemagne. In his early years von Braun developed a passion for astronomy. Following the signing of the armistice and the end of the First World War, Wirsitz was transferred from Germany to Poland and the von Braun family moved to Germany settling in Berlin. It was here that he had his initial encounters with rocketry when he at the age of 12 was inspired by the speed records set by Max Valier and Fritz von Opel in rocket propelled cars. After blowing up a weapon to which he had attached fireworks he was arrested only to be released shortly thereafter.
 
An avid amateur musician, he learned to play both Beethoven and Bach from memory. By 1925, he was enrolled in a boarding school at Ettersburg Castle near Weimar. With his passion for space travel and rocketry fuelling his young mind, he acquired an influential work on the subject the book Die Rakete zu den Planetenräumen or By Rocket into Interplanetary Space written by Hermann Oberth a leading rocket pioneer. After being transferred to Hermann-Lietz-Internat, another boarding school located on the island of Spiekeroog; von Braun applying himself to the studies of physics and mathematics determined to pursue his interest in rocket engineering.
 
By 1930, he was attending the Technische Hochschule Berlin or 'Berlin Institute of Technology' where he became a member of the Verein für Raumschiffahrt 'Spaceflight Society'. He obtained a degree in aeronautical engineering from the Institute in 1932. From his early exposure to rocket sciences he developed the conclusion that rocket science was not advanced enough to support space exploration and would require more aspects of science than were currently applied to the field. He enrolled in the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Berlin for post graduate studies in the fields of physics, chemistry and astronomy where he would receive a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Physics in 1934. He received encouragement for his studies from the high altitude balloon pioneer Auguste Piccard.
 
 
Coinciding with his developing interests in rocket science, the situation in Germany has been shaped in years of turmoil and political upheaval. After the end of the First World War and the abdication of the German monarchy, the Weimar Republic had been instated with a liberal democracy. President of the Weimar Republic Paul von Hindenburg, a former Prussian General Field Marshal during the First World War initiated dictatorial emergency powers and reinstated the position of Chancellor of Germany by 1930. Germany would see several Chancellors in Heinrich Brüning, Franz von Papen and Kurt von Schleicher before finally Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor with the ascent of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or National Socialist German Workers Party commonly abbreviated as NSDAP or Nazi Party in 1933. With his focus on his doctoral studies, von Braun seemed for the most part unaware of the changes sweeping across Germany at the time. As a German born to an aristocratic family, he was patriotic towards his country but rocketry was his main focus. On 12 November 1937 he applied for membership in the Nazi Party and was assigned the membership number 5,738,692.
 
His activities with the Verein für Raumschiffahrt caught the attention of the Reichswehr, Germany's armed forces in 1932. While attending one of the launches of von Braun's rockets, Army officers took notice of the young engineer and the promise that he garnered towards the development of German rocket science. Walter Dornberger, an Artillery officer in the German Army Ordnance Corps presented von Braun with the opportunity to further develop his rockets through researching military applications for rockets. Presented with the opportunity of having his rocket research paid for at the behest of the German Army, von Braun couldn't refuse and accepted Dornberger's offer. Under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles following the end of the First World War, Germany had been prohibited the development of military aviation applications, rocketry had not been barred from research and thus development in rocketry was rapidly advancing.
 
In 1934, Wernher von Braun completed a work on the subject of rocketry in which he titled 'Construction, Theoretical, and Experimental Solution to the Problem of the Liquid Propellant Rocket'. Its contents were determined to be so vital to the national security of Germany that the document was given a classified status and transferred to the control of the German Army. Germany showed great interest in the works of American scientist Robert H. Goddard's works and regularly contacted him in the years leading up to the Second World War with technical questions and concerns. It was Goddard's works that von Braun incorporated into the development of his Aggregat or A series of rockets. The word Aggregat is a German word meaning 'The use of multiple appliances or machines to fulfill a certain technological function'. With von Braun now working with the German Army, the Verein für Raumschiffahrt which had rejected proposals from the German Army had a hard time finding funding for its own continued research and was dissolved in 1933.
 
 
 
With the dissolution of the Verein für Raumschiffahrt group, civilian rocket launches were banned by the new Nazi government with only rocket tests conducted for military purposes being authorized. The home for the advancement of these rocket tests and the location von Braun would come to call home was a large facility built near the village of Peenemünde in northern Germany located on the Baltic Sea. The Artillery Captain who had initially brought Wernher von Braun into military rocket science, Walter Dornberger became commander of the Peenemünde facility with Wernher von Braun as technical director. It would be here at Peenemünde in association with the German Luftwaffe that von Braun would contribute to the development of the A-4 ballistic missile and a supersonic guided anti aircraft missile designated 'Wasserfall'. Large amounts of research were dedicated to the development of liquid fuel rocket engines to power not only missiles but also aircraft engines and jet assisted takeoff devices.
 
On 22 December 1942, Adolf Hitler issued an order to initiate the A-4 rocket into the  Vergeltungswaffe or 'Revenge Weapon' program with aims of targeting London. Following the presentation of a film documenting a demonstration of the A-4, Hitler was so enthused by its promise that he made von Braun a professor of science. Following a bombing raid on the Peenemünde facility which killed several of von Braun's scientists by RAF Bomber Command, the first A-4 now designated V-2 for propaganda purposes was fired at England on 7 September 1944. Von Braun's rocket development in Peenemünde was in later years criticized for the use of slave labor from the Mittelbau-Dora and Buchenwald concentration camps.Under the influence of SS Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler, Wernher von Braun had been commissioned as an Untersturmführer 'Second Lieutenant' in the Allgemeine SS. Having expressed regret that he was not progressing his research towards his achievement of space exploration but that his scientific exploits were squandered on weapons for waging war, one that was not going well, Von Braun was arrested by Gestapo under charges trumped up by Himmler stating that he was a communist sympathizer with plans to sabotage the German rocket program before fleeing to England. He was only released from prison through the exploits of Walter Dornberger  and Albert Speer, the Reichsminister for Munitions and War Production.
 
With the Soviet Army near Peenemünde in 1945, von Braun assembled his staff and decided that enough was enough they had to surrender and bring an end to their war atleast. But to whom would they surrender to? It was decided that surrendering to the advancing Soviet Army was out of the question. The Soviets were well known for their brutal treatment of prisoners of war especially those who were documented members of the Nazi Party. It was decided that they would flee the Peenemünde facility and surrender to American forces. Under orders from SS General Hans Kammler, the team was to be relocated from Peenemünde to central Germany to progress their work. In the final days before the relocation, a contradicting report from Kammler ordered the scientists to join the Army and fight against the advancing Soviets. He and his team of nearly 500 associates fabricated documents and were transferred to Mittelwerk but not before ordering that many of his documents and blueprints be hidden away in an abandoned mine shaft in the Harz Mountains to avoid their destruction by the SS.
 
Following a car accident in which he suffered a compound fracture of the left arm and shoulder, he had his arm placed in a cast although a month later his arm would have to be rebroken and realigned due to negligent care of his wound. He was then transferred to the town of Oberammergau in the Bavarian Alps.
 
 
Von Braun's brother Magnus also a rocket engineer approached an American Private from the 44th Infantry Division and announced his intentions to surrender to the United States on 2 May 1945. On 19 June 1945, two days before the area was to be turned over to Soviet authorities US Major Robert B Staver, Chief of the Jet Propulsion Section of the Research and Intelligence Branch of the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps in London and Lieutenant Colonel R.L. Williams transferred von Braun and his team to Garmisch near Munich where they were then flown to Nordhausen and Witzenhausen in the American sector of Germany to avoid their fall into Soviet custody. After being debriefed by American and British intelligence officials he was recruited under Operation Paperclip where he was relocated to the United States.
 
Upon arrival in the United States, von Braun along with his team were granted funding to continue rocket research under the United States government and in exchange their association to the Nazi Party would be expunged from their records. Once their records had been cleared, the government granted the scientists security clearances for work at some of the nation's most sensitive facilities. The first stop for many of von Braun's associates were to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland to organize the documents brought to the United States from Peenemünde. Von Braun and his remaining Peenemünde team were sent first to Fort Bliss, Texas and White Sands Proving Grounds in New Mexico where they trained military personnel on the intricacies of rockets and guided missiles before helping refurbish, assemble and launch a number of captured V-2 rockets transported to the United States from Germany.
 
 
By 1950 and the outbreak of the war in Korea, Wernher von Braun and his team were transferred from Fort Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama where he would lead a U.S. Army rocket development team at Redstone Arsenal. The results of the research conducted by the team was the PGM-11 Redstone Rocket on 8 April 1952. The development of the Redstone rocket led to the first live nuclear ballistic missile tests conducted in the United States. A subsequent development in the development of the Redstone rocket was the first high precision inertial guidance system mounted on a rocket. Soon he would be appointed as Director of the Development Operations Division of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, where von Braun and his team would led the development of the Jupiter C series rocket which was essentially a modified Redstone rocket. The Jupiter C rocket would go on to perform three suborbital spaceflights throughout the 1950s before launching the West's first satellite known as Explorer I on 31 January 1958.
 
Von Braun remained determined to utilize his research in the subject of space exploration he began advocating space flight. With the Soviet Union launching Sputnik I on 4 October 1957, the way had been paved for von Braun to accomplish his dreams as the United States became determined to outdo the Soviets in the realm of space exploration. On 29 July 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration better known as NASA was established and in 1960, the Marshal Space Flight Center was opened at Redstone Arsenal. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency was transferred to NASA control under the provision that von Braun and his team be allowed to continue their research on a much larger rocket than the PGM-11 or Jupiter C series rockets which would be designated as the Saturn series rocket. Von Braun was designated as the Marshal Space Flight Center's first director presiding over the facility from July 1960 to February 1970.
 
 
 
 
 
From the successes of the Saturn program, the Apollo program for manned moon flights was developed and his dream for putting a man on the moon was realized when on 16 July 1969, one of his Saturn V rockets propelled the crew of Apollo 11 beyond the atmosphere of planet Earth to the lunar surface. Throughout the duration of the Saturn program, von Braun's rockets would put six teams of astronauts on the moon. He would be influential in the establishment of the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville. He also envisioned the idea of U.S. Space Camp for training children in the fields of science and technology. After relocating from Alabama to Washington DC to take a senior level position in NASA, von Braun retired from NASA on 26 May 1972 with the realization that his goals for space exploration and those of NASA's were not one in the same. In his latter years he would serve as Vice President for Engineering and Development for the Fairchild Industries company and performing services as a public speaker at colleges and universities across the country.
 
 
He helped to establish the National Space Institute in 1975 and became its first chairman as well as become a consultant to the CEO of Orbital Transport und Raketen AG, or 'Orbital Transport and Rockets, Inc' a West German company based in Stuttgart. His health gradually declined following the onset of kidney cancer which forced him to retired from Fairchild Industries on 31 December 1976. He was later hospitalized from complications due to cancer and was unable to attend a ceremony in which he  was presented the National Medal of Science. Wernher von Braun would die on 16 June 1977 of pancreatic cancer in Alexandria, Virginia at the age of 65. He was buried